‘Bagel head’: My theory

The currently most-popular article on Huffington Post is about saline forehead injections, ‘Japan’s hot new beauty trend’:

Botox is more ubiquitous than yoga pants in Hollywood. But women (and men) in Asia have been taking part in a different injection “trend” for years: saline bagel-shaped injections on one’s forehead.

Here’s how it goes down: technicians insert a needle into the forehead and inject about 400 cc of saline to create a forehead-sized blob. (One bagel-ee describes is as feeling like “something’s dripping down [his] head” and a “slight stinging sensation.”) The practitioner then places his or her thumb into the blob to create the indentation.

It’s the kind of story I would file away with vodka eyeballing (i.e. as reliable as a New York Times trend piece), save for the existence of horrifying, graphic photographic evidence:

Continue reading ‘Bagel head’: My theory

The real reason Obama and Bibi can’t just get along

Bibi’s speech at the UN is making headlines because of his spot-on impression of – depending on whom you ask – Wile E. Coyote, or Adolf S. Hitler [see above]. Drawing considerably less attention were his attempts to make amends with the Obama administration:

Two days ago President Obama reiterated that the threat of a nuclear Iran cannot be contained… We thank and support President Obama for his position. I believe Democrats and Republicans alike share his position, and it is shared by leaders around the world … Israel is in discussions with the United States on this issue, and I am confident that we can chart a path forward together.

The comments came the same day as a ‘leaked’ Israeli memo indicated that current sanctions against Iran are working, and that the approach might pay dividends and obviate the need for a pre-emptive strike on pre-nuclear Iran. Prior to Netanyahu’s speech, the New York Times speculated as to the source of the leak:

Continue reading The real reason Obama and Bibi can’t just get along

The horror that is Mitt Romney’s campaign logo

I know I’ve given Mitt a lot Mitt sh*t over the past few weeks for all manner of shenanigans and tomfoolery. While I’ll happily stand by the assertion that much of that was deserved, I also know it’s opened me up to the accusation of being a partisan hack. I don’t think that’s entirely fair – there are certainly Republican candidates *cough* Huntsman *cough* I might have supported against Obama – I do recognize that my lack of enthusiasm for the current Republican candidate has gone largely undisguised.

It is against that backdrop that I preface this post with the disclaimer: This post is not about Romney the person, or even about Romney the candidate. This is not about my political views, it’s about my personal opinion as someone who clearly spends too much time and energy worrying about design issues. More specifically, it’s about ‘Romney’ the logo – or more accurately, R omney:

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Two final thoughts from Monday night’s game

God knows enough ink has been spilled over 8 seconds of football – my own post has now undergone three revisions in as many days – but since this is, like, my one opportunity to write about the Seahawks and expect someone to read it, here goes. I’ll keep ’em quick, promise.

1. Ian Rapoport, on NFL.com:

Is there a better hardcore runner than Marshawn Lynch? […] I’d have a hard time imagining someone who runs harder with less care for the hits he takes. That fourth-and-2 carry, where he kept his legs moving and essentially carried B.J. Raji on his back was just unreal […] When scouting, I don’t know how you’d measure this. There’s no  category at the combine for ability to gain three key yards while carrying a 360-pounder on your back.

One of my favorite reactions to the final play of the game went something to the effect of, “Jennings might have caught the ball, but Tate caught Jennings AND the ball, which is much more difficult.”

Here, we have Marshawn Lynch carrying B.J. Raji AND the ball, which sounds even more impressive than Tate’s accomplishment – except that Lynch is actually used to putting the whole TEAM on his back, so what’s another 360 pounds do?

Continue reading Two final thoughts from Monday night’s game

I like to think this would not have happened at Penn

From the front page of today’s Yale Daily News [see for yourself here, or if you don’t like squinting, read on]:

What a tease! Though a key part of Yom Kippur is fasting, the menu in the residential dining halls includes a number of traditionally Israeli dishes, such as Matzoh Ball Soup…

I like to imagine the paper’s Israeli Jewish staff took the night off.

Continue reading I like to think this would not have happened at Penn

Monday night’s game is not why the lockout had to end

As of last night, I had no intention of commenting on the call. But after a good night’s sleep, I decided to weigh in, for the sake of sanity – mine, and everyone else’s.

It seems that much of the outrage has been directed at the Lingerie Football League referees, and at the NFL owners who hired them. The opinion hardly varies whether you’re asking a professional mainstream journalist, a sports journalist, or a sports fan:

Continue reading Monday night’s game is not why the lockout had to end

Mitt Romney’s physical raises exactly as many questions as it answers

Mitt Romney went in for a physical last month, and received from his doctor – good news for anyone who still thinks he might win – a clean bill of health:

Continue reading Mitt Romney’s physical raises exactly as many questions as it answers

Could Steve Jobs have saved Apple from itself?

It didn’t take long after his death for the world to arrive at a consensus: Steve Jobs was no Saint. As chronicled in the New York Times, articles to that effect began to appear within 18 hours of his death:

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What the Oregon Trail means for conservation in America

A recent survey that asked 12 environmental NGOs to rank the three environmentally-friendliest presidents declared Barack Obama the 4th-greenest in American history.

Leaving aside that his only first-place vote was awarded by Rebuild the Dream – founded by former Obama adviser Van Jones – what exactly has the current administration done to earn Obama’s 90th percentile-designation? Well, I’m not here to talk about his overall environmental record. Instead, this post will focus on one very narrow issue: the conservation of land.

Continue reading What the Oregon Trail means for conservation in America