Trying to make sense of the Nin Com Soup Nutzy

A cafe in London intent on living up to a name that otherwise makes little sense for a coffee shop — Nin Com Soup — drew some attention last month when it introduced a new flavor of smoothie, decorated it with a swastika, and called it “Nutzy”.

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Setting the record straight on BART’s updated color scheme

In its article describing the new trains designed for Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART), a Bay Area Publication (BAP) felt the need to assure its readers that any similarity between the cars’ interior color scheme and Santa Clara‘s erstwhile nemesis from the north was purely incidental: “This is no homage to Russell Wilson and gang.”

But this should have gone without saying. Not because deliberate homage would have garnered few fans, or because — as BART marketing and research manager Aaron Weinstein told WIRED — “any combination of hues would run into sports allegiances,” but simply because the magazine mixed up its Seattle sports teams.

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Second-guessing the visually-impaired

First, some necessary background: Thursday Night Football games are pretty much the worst, and while the NFL seems disinterested in discontinuing them, at least it does what it can to improve the viewer experience. For example, after New Jersey’s New York Jets and New York’s Buffalo Bills faced off last season, some fans complained they had trouble differentiating between the Jets’ all-green and Bills’ all-red “color rush” uniforms. So when those teams met again on a Thursday night earlier this season, the league came up with a simple solution: the Jets wore all-white instead of all-green. Problem solved. (Or, at least, one of them. Thursday Night Football remains a terrible idea.)

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The failing New York Times may be taking this whole “post-truth” thing a little too seriously

The New York Times reported Tuesday on the installation of a cross at the St. Nicholas National Shrine beneath the World Trade  Center. The Times’ article included a most curious assertion:

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Making sense of Lewis Black’s pre-election prophecy

One month before the election, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart holdover correspondent Lewis Black turned up on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah to record a fresh segment of Back in Black. He highlighted how few Americans choose to vote and urged eligible voters to overcome personal distaste for both candidates:

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Why the Seahawks’ rejoinder to Jimmy Fallon came up just inches short

Earlier this month, the Seattle Seahawks hit back at Tonight Show host Jimmy Fallon with their own take on his recurring segment “Tonight Show Superlatives“. This was actually their second crack back at the late night host. In the first go-around, the Hawks went with their own version of that exact segment and titled it, oh so cleverly, “Seahawks Superlatives“. This time — almost exactly one year later — they instead spoofed Jimmy Fallon’s “Thank You Notes“.

Both Seahawks responses were cute enough — though nobody seems to have told Russell Wilson that his thank you note should be addressed to Jimmy Fallon — but both also left me thinking the Seahawks blew their huge opportunity to dunk one through the goal posts (like Jimmy Graham).

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The right way to fact-check President Trump

During the election, media organizations were forced to create new and inventive ways to communicate Donald Trump’s new and inventive relationship with the truth. Here’s one famous example:

Such efforts went over so well that some people have clamored for the networks to deploy such correctives on a more regular basis:

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Steve Bannon is not so far outside the American mainstream, after all

Now that erstwhile campaign manager Steve Bannon helped make the White House white (nationalist) again, President-Elect Donald Trump graciously decided to let him stick around. Unsurprisingly, the announcement that Bannon would fill the role of chief strategist in the Trump administration caused consternation in the Jewish community due to his ex-wife’s allegation that he is an anti-Semite.

Although said ex proffered several bits of evidence to support her claim, only one has been corroborated by independent sources: that Bannon wanted to know why the Westland School’s library stocked so many books about Chanuka. In context, the fact that Bannon singled out Chanuka suggests an unseemly level of concern over Jewish representation at the school.*

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Mel Gibson and Stephen Colbert haven’t changed at all

On Tuesday night, Stephen Colbert hit Mel Gibson hard: “Hey, Mel-Mels? When you look back on your life, do you think you’ll have any regrets?” (Mel-Mels’ reply: “No. Not one.”) And had Gibson asked Colbert the same question in return, I’m sure Stephen could have come up with at least one regret of his own: going soft on erstwhile interviewee Donald Trump.

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