Tag Archives: Baseball

Tim Egan has a funny definition of “winning”

I like Tim Egan a lot. So much so that when I had to write an essay about my favorite journalist (in order to enroll in a law school writing class), I chose him like some kind of pikachu. But something in his latest column for the New York Times left me scratching my head.

The central conceit of his column — titled “We’re winning!” — is that, well, we’re winning. “We”, in this instance, being America. “Winning,” in this instance . . . well, that’s what I wanted to talk about.

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The subtle sexism of closed captioning

After Hillary Clinton became the first woman nominated for President by a major political party in the United States (one helluva baseball stat), a lot of ink was spilled in the matter of her outfit. To many, the fixation on the female nominee’s sartorial decision-making was clear evidence of sexism. For the media to give the same sort of attention to what a man chose to wear, they pointed out, would come off as absurd.

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This is what happens when you let foreigners take good American jobs

Trevor Noah is not the first person to artlessly skewer Marco Rubio for being something of a sweaty guy. Indeed, Donald Trump noted it at least eight different ways a full year out from the 2016 election, and if Trump did it, you know he did it better and classier than it’s ever been done before, believe me.

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Tablet breathes fresh life into the theory Alex Rodriguez is Jewish

Way back in the warm afterglow of the Big Bang that birthed this blog (i.e. January 2012), I put together a post asking whether Alex Rodriguez is Jewish. The answer, I discovered, is almost certainly No — but I also learned a few worthwhile lessons from the consideration of the relevant evidence. You’re welcome, of course, to check it out.

And that’s where things stood, until last week, when Tablet Magazine put together a list of the “All-Time Jewish Home Run Kings“. No, A-Rod wasn’t exactly on that list — but he did manage to make an appearance anyway:

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Why I’m not too worried about Russell Wilson’s “questionable” decision-making

I’ll admit that in the past I’ve expressed concern regarding Russell Wilson’s questionable decision-making. See, “The narrative is wrong: Russell Wilson makes questionable decisions, too“, and “The one guy Russell Wilson needs to stop taking advice from“. But here’s the thing: both of those posts deal with his decision-making ability off the field. I have yet to question (so far as I can recall) his ability on the field. Which is why scaremongering headlines like this one — “Russell Wilson’s Decision-Making Is a Concern Heading into Super Bowl” — don’t have me too worried heading into Super Bowl Sunday.

In fact, in case I wasn’t confident enough before, the article itself actually helped reassure me. Here’s how its author, Sean Tomlinson, spins Wilson’s performance against Green Bay in the NFC Championship Game into his source of primary concern:

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The one guy Russell Wilson needs to stop taking advice from

In his column published in Derek Jeter’s The Player’s Tribune today, Seahawks QB Russell Wilson wrote about some of the individuals he leans on for support and draws on for advice. DangeRuss mentioned only one person by name who does not play football for a living (like Marshawn Lynch, Jermaine Kearse, and Doug Baldwin) or work directly for a football team (e.g. Michael Gervais) — and I’m here to tell him he should probably stop doing that:

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The Patriots are hardly the only Super Bowl team to suffer from deflated balls

As you may have heard, the New England Patriots stand accused of deflating the balls they used on offense in the AFC Championship Game, in clear violation of NFL rules. And if Tom Brady can turn #deflategate into a series of inappropriate jokes, I am more than willing to play along. This shouldn’t be too hard.

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The Green Bay Packers couldn’t even beat the Seattle Mariners

On Opening Night of their 2014 season, the Seattle Mariners hosted a number of recently-anointed World Champion Seattle Seahawks. It was, by all accounts, awkward. As the Seattle Times noted, the Hawks received louder cheers than the real home team, and the words “SEA” and “HAWKS” reverberated throughout Safeco Field all night long.

The outcome of that encounter should not really have come as much of a surprise: the Hawks recently captivated the city of Seattle, while the Mariners haven’t been to the playoffs since 2011. Compounding matters, while the Mariners front office recently suffered a hit job at the hands of Geoff Baker at the Seattle Times — who painted a picture of dysfunction from top to bottom across the organization — the Seahawks offer the cutting-edge blueprint for success in the NFL:

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LeBron James doesn’t think his children are as tough as he is

LeBron James made headlines Friday* when he informed ESPN of his Decision not to let his sons play football because of “the health dangers”. Presumably, James is concerned about “the health dangers” posed by concussion and other violence-induced head injuries that have driven down participation in youth football programs by over 10% in over just a three-year span (2010-2012). Those are legit.

But don’t let James fool you into thinking he is taking some sort of principled stand against the dangers of participating in sport.

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ESPN reporting only one side of the Miguel Cabrera story

When Miguel Cabrera turned down his share of the Tigers’ postseason bonus, sports media rushed to cover his noble deed. But I felt obligated to make sure that in their rush to lionize this Tiger, we don’t forget the tale’s tail. By way of review, here’s the full story:

Continue reading ESPN reporting only one side of the Miguel Cabrera story