Tag Archives: Browns

Turns out the Packers earned themselves a trip to the Super Bowl, after all

The traditional consolation prize for losing in the Championship round of the NFL playoffs is a trip to the Pro Bowl. It’s no Super Bowl, but a free trip to Hawaii is nothing to sniff at (unless you’re Marshawn Lynch). But this year, after their heartbreaking overtime loss to the Seahawks, a few Packers ended up with a trip to the Super Bowl anyway.

I’m sorry, did I say Super Bowl? I meant the Key & Peele Super Bowl Special:

Continue reading Turns out the Packers earned themselves a trip to the Super Bowl, after all

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Hard to blame the latest incident on Johnny Football

Via Washington Post:

Johnny Manziel’s season was ended prematurely last week when the Cleveland Browns placed him on the injured reserve list with a hamstring injury. But that doesn’t mean that his responsibilities to the team were over and, when Manziel was late to get treatment on his leg Saturday morning, he was fined by the Browns . . .

[T]he Browns had to send security staff to Manziel’s house to try to locate him. While it’s true that Manziel’s season is over, it’s a terrible misstep for a player whose partying ways were famous in college and during his first season in the NFL.

Continue reading Hard to blame the latest incident on Johnny Football

LeBron James doesn’t think his children are as tough as he is

LeBron James made headlines Friday* when he informed ESPN of his Decision not to let his sons play football because of “the health dangers”. Presumably, James is concerned about “the health dangers” posed by concussion and other violence-induced head injuries that have driven down participation in youth football programs by over 10% in over just a three-year span (2010-2012). Those are legit.

But don’t let James fool you into thinking he is taking some sort of principled stand against the dangers of participating in sport.

Continue reading LeBron James doesn’t think his children are as tough as he is

It might be time to get nervous in San Francisco

Seahawks fans breathed a deep sigh of relief last week when rumored holdout Marshawn Lynch showed up to his team’s involuntary offseason minicamp. He didn’t actually participate in the practices (putatively due to an injured foot or some such excuse), so his contract situation is far from resolved going into the 2014 season, but his appearance gave Seattle good reason to feel optimistic about his future with the team.

Down by the Bay, by contrast, it might be time to get nervous. The absences of Vernon Davis and Alex Boone are drawing the headlines — especially after Head Coach Jim Harbaugh “stepped in it” by excoriating them to the press — but were I a fan of the Niners, I’d expend most of my worrying on the man who’s supposed to be running the show.

Continue reading It might be time to get nervous in San Francisco

Aaron Hernandez charged with murder; which city will welcome him home next?

A few days ago, when it looked like Aaron Hernandez was about to be arrested for obstruction of justice, I not-so-subtly accused him of having committed considerably more than that. I made those allegations on the basis of no specific information in particular, which I suppose means I may have exposed myself to liability for libel had he never been so charged.*

But no matter: Hernandez was finally arrested this morning and charged with murder — bad news for Hernandez, but good news for my credibility. And he would have gotten away with it, too, if it wasn’t for those darn texts and deliberately-sabotaged home security system and actual video footage and proximity to the event and acquaintance with the victim and especially for those meddling kids.

Hernandez’s team, the New England Patriots, immediately tried to distance itself from the tight end, announcing his release just two hours after news broke of the arrest — and just one year after signing him to a 5-year, $37.5 million contract. The NFL as a league tried to distance itself, as well, releasing a statement calling the arrest “deeply troubling”:

Continue reading Aaron Hernandez charged with murder; which city will welcome him home next?

I’ve never been so happy to be so wrong

If you remember my post titled Could 2013 be the best year for online comments ever? — and if you don’t, check it out — you may know this is not my first time writing about the Seahawks defensive line.

That makes sense. A unit once-prized for its ability to stop the run got run over over the second half of the 2012 season, and then lost its best/only consistent pass rush when Chris Clemons went down on the same FedEx turf that victimized RGIII all season. The line failed to pressure Matt Ryan in the Seahawks’ subsequent loss (and elimination) to Atlanta, so the team went into free agency with one overarching imperative: upgrade the D-Line.

Meanwhile, the team has a lot of young players due for contract extensions in coming years — contract extensions that threaten to strain the Seahawks ability to stay within the salary cap. Finances, then, were an obvious constraint on Seattle’s ability to upgrade.

So it was when knowledgeable people broke down Seattle’s options in free agency, they tended to focus on lower-impact, cheaper players to fill out the defensive line. Danny Kelly, over at Field Gulls, broke available players into tiers and discussed the likelihood of the team signing a player from each. Here’s what he had to say about the “Young, talented, super-expensive, probably” tier:

Continue reading I’ve never been so happy to be so wrong

The New York Times officially has no standards

The New York Times recently published award-season predictions by Chase Stuart, who “writes about the historical and statistical side of football at his site, FootballPerspective.com.” The post includes his pick for NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year, Robert Griffin the third. Obviously, I’d like to see Russell Wilson get it. That said, I understand that RWI probably isn’t going to win in a season when there is a strong case to be made for Andrew Luck, RGIII, and even Alfred Morris.

But here’s the thing: if there is a case to be made for RGIII, Stuart didn’t make it.

I plan to quote the entire (short) section more-or-less in full, so no need to check out the original:

Continue reading The New York Times officially has no standards