Tag Archives: Canada

Tim Egan has a funny definition of “winning”

I like Tim Egan a lot. So much so that when I had to write an essay about my favorite journalist (in order to enroll in a law school writing class), I chose him like some kind of pikachu. But something in his latest column for the New York Times left me scratching my head.

The central conceit of his column — titled “We’re winning!” — is that, well, we’re winning. “We”, in this instance, being America. “Winning,” in this instance . . . well, that’s what I wanted to talk about.

Continue reading Tim Egan has a funny definition of “winning”

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Who should the GOP draft to take down Trump? This brave five year-old girl

There’s been a lot of finger-pointing about just who is most responsible for the rise of Trump, but there is at least one point of broad consensus: for too long, the GOP was afraid of attacking him, and his adversaries spent far too long tearing down one another instead.

On some level, their strategy was understandable: Trump was a punchline until he wasn’t, and so his rivals devoted most of their energy to jockeying for second place. Moreover, it’s unclear that any of their attacks would even stick. When Marco Rubio tried his hand at insult comedy, the results fell far short of spectacular.

But those considerations did not deter all his adversaries. Back in 2010, one five year-old girl issued a challenge to Donald Trump, nearly six years before any Republican candidate managed to accomplish the same feat:

Continue reading Who should the GOP draft to take down Trump? This brave five year-old girl

If only Stephen Colbert had read Paper Treiger

A good friend is extremely fond of Stephen Colbert, but somewhat less committed to actually watching his every word than I am. So when I do watch The Late Show with Stephen Colbert (to say nothing of the Colbert Report before it) every next-morning, I try to pass along his best work as a public service.

Truth(iness) is, the worthwhile pieces have been noticeably fewer and farther between since Stephen made the switch to CBS, despite the fact that he now has twice as long on the air — not to mention Fridays! Indeed, this past Friday’s show contained just the third LSSC clip I felt moved to forward [redacted]’s way. The clip in question was, in my opinion, vintage Colbert:

Continue reading If only Stephen Colbert had read Paper Treiger

In which Marco Rubio’s campaign logo receives a much-needed makeover

I’ve published two attempts to touch up Presidential campaign logos, to decidedly mixed success. I’m still quite proud of my first effort, but the second was an unmitigated disaster. So it is with some trepidation that I tread once more in increasingly familiar waters.

But let’s be real — after I learned that Marco Rubio created an ad titled “Morning Again in America” (because “Make America Morning Again” is a phonetic disaster) using stock footage from Canada, well:

Continue reading In which Marco Rubio’s campaign logo receives a much-needed makeover

Someone get the NFL a dictionary. And a calendar.

They called it Super Bowl 50 so you’d forget the “L” stands for “lies”.

During this year’s Super Bowl pre-game ceremony, the broadcaster mentioned that the league was celebrating the “fiftieth anniversary of the Super Bowl”. As it happens, you can listen for yourself in the very first few seconds of these official NFL Super Bowl highlights:

Continue reading Someone get the NFL a dictionary. And a calendar.

A minor indicator of the state of U.S.-Israeli relations under the Obama Administration

President Obama took two days to “congratulate” Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on his recent re-election, which prompted the New York Times to wonder “whether the [Obama administration’s antagonism toward Netanyahu] represents a lasting foreign policy shift.” Let’s investigate! We’ll begin our studies with Iran, of all places. Consider the following Press Statement published today by the State Department:

Continue reading A minor indicator of the state of U.S.-Israeli relations under the Obama Administration

What it will take to prevent the next U.S. Airways Flight 1549

You know the name Captain Chesley Burnett “Sully” Sullenberger, III, because of a bird. You might think it’s because he piloted his plane to a successful crash-landing on the Hudson River just over five years ago, but all that never would have happened had US Airways Flight 1549 not first struck a flock of Canada geese. Of course, 155 passengers and crew are alive today because of Sully’s skills and quick thinking, but those geese could have hit anybody, and I like to tell myself other pilots could pull off the same feat.

I hope to never learn to the contrary.

Continue reading What it will take to prevent the next U.S. Airways Flight 1549

Looks like I owe a meow culpaw

I recently came across what I instantly believed to be the worst idea for a non-profit organization I had ever encountered, and my immediate instinct was to share it with you all. It appeared in a story about an African serval — an exotic cat — spotted running along a road on Vancouver Island (somewhere it obviously didn’t belong):

Doug Nelson, a Nanaimo cat breeder, said the serval could be the same one he sold to a Sooke resident. That serval escaped in August and couldn’t be recovered for several weeks.

Seems like a perfectly plausible explanation. But the article went on:

Continue reading Looks like I owe a meow culpaw

Vox article on the superiority of Canadians includes (at least) one unfortunate blunder

No doubt aboot it: Canada is better than America in at least 7 ways” crows Sarah Kliff — if that’s her real name — for Vox. The post itself is not all that exciting — except for the sorts of reasons I tend to find the internet exciting: Kliff done goofed, in a deliciously ironic way.

Number 5 of Sarah’s 7 ways has to do with educational  attainment:

Continue reading Vox article on the superiority of Canadians includes (at least) one unfortunate blunder

The curse of the Bing search screen

Local search engine Bing hosts a rotating cast of photographs, which I happen to see every day because they are featured on the search screen of my Windows Phone. The photos always feature embedded hints and teasers meant to encourage visitors to click through and google more using Bing.

I last took special note of the home page this past Mother’s Day. The photograph caught my eye today because it looked quite familiar:

Continue reading The curse of the Bing search screen