Tag Archives: Chicago

Tim Egan has a funny definition of “winning”

I like Tim Egan a lot. So much so that when I had to write an essay about my favorite journalist (in order to enroll in a law school writing class), I chose him like some kind of pikachu. But something in his latest column for the New York Times left me scratching my head.

The central conceit of his column — titled “We’re winning!” — is that, well, we’re winning. “We”, in this instance, being America. “Winning,” in this instance . . . well, that’s what I wanted to talk about.

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What it will take to prevent the next U.S. Airways Flight 1549

You know the name Captain Chesley Burnett “Sully” Sullenberger, III, because of a bird. You might think it’s because he piloted his plane to a successful crash-landing on the Hudson River just over five years ago, but all that never would have happened had US Airways Flight 1549 not first struck a flock of Canada geese. Of course, 155 passengers and crew are alive today because of Sully’s skills and quick thinking, but those geese could have hit anybody, and I like to tell myself other pilots could pull off the same feat.

I hope to never learn to the contrary.

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A bit of Valentine’s Day advice from Mark Zuckerberg

The Facebook trend notification that inspired the present post actually appeared on my timeline last May, but since the lesson I think it conveys seems appropriate  to Valentine’s Day, I refrained from sharing it until now.

The lesson from Mark is really very simple:

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Why I’m not too worried about the Seahawks’ early deficit

The Seahawks are down early against Green Bay, but I’m not too worried. Why not? Check out what’s on the White House schedule for the coming week:

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How Russell Wilson escaped the curse of Justin Bieber

When Richard Sherman was named this past year’s Madden cover boy, I imagine a significant fraction of football fans felt schadenfreudic tinglings: Sherman — thug, villain, superstar — would surely fall victim to the vaunted Madden Curse. After all, he had only one direction to fall.

But this past week, Sherman was named NFC Defensive Player of the Week after nearly becoming the San Francisco 49ers’ leading receiver (Colin Kaepernick threw him two passes; the actual leader caught three). That recognition makes him the only player in the NFL to receive the honor in each of the past three seasons (and those 22nd and 23rd interceptions stretched his lead since entering the league to 8).

RS25 has been frustratingly (to his haters) just fine.

But there is another, far more serious, curse the Seahawks have had to contend with in 2014: the Curse of the Bieber. As has been established on this very blog, Russell Wilson does not always make the wisest of wise decisions, and so in early May he failed to extricate himself (or those poor, doomed children) from an obviously dangerous situation:

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Of Moose & Men: an amateur history of Teddy Roosevelt & cannibalism &c.

I don’t only write about late-night Comedy Central television programming. It only sometimes seems like I do. And in this case, it seems too much — this post is about Teddy Roosevelt, not Stephen Colbert.

When Colbert’s guest, Rob Rhinehart — the inventor of soylent, the food-like food substitute — pointed out that “the environmental burden of animal products is massive” and invoked President Theodore Roosevelt in support of a pro-conservation agenda, the Colbert Report host was ready to retort in kind: “Teddy Roosevelt also said, ‘I’m going to go kill and eat a moose.'” Touché, Mr. Colbert. As host, you get the last word — fortunately, the internet has empowered me with the ability to write words and scatter them to the ether(net), and I intend to take full advantage of that opportunity to take a slightly more nuanced look at Teddy’s relationship with animal consumption.

Roosevelt’s was, of course, a hunter who loved to pose with victims he’d have to pony up $350K+ to embullet today (partly thanks to his own pioneering efforts in land and animal conservation — but more about those momentarily):

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Real winners and losers from baseball’s opening day

The baseball season is (roughly) one day old, but that didn’t stop Yahoo! Sports from publishing an article titled “Winners and losers from the ‘real’ opening day“:

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Are you more likely to be killed in Iraq or Chicago, revisited

Back in May, the Huffington Post ran a headline that declared Iraq ‘hell’. With over 450 people killed that month alone, I thought that description was apt. But to put American gun violence in perspective, I also took the opportunity to point out that, adjusted for population, the rate of homicide in Iraq roughly mirrored the odds of being shot and killed in Chicago.

Back when I ran those numbers, Iraq was experiencing one homicide for every 73,000 citizens and Chicago was at one for every 75,000. For the mathematically-challenged among you, that meant Chicago was approximately one tick safer than Iraq.

The problem with a tick is that it is often followed by a tock and then another tick and then a big explosion. And that seems to be what’s gone on in Iraq ever since I published my article back in May. Indeed, a recent headline banner on the home page of Huffington Post declared that 2,720 people have died in Iraq since the end of April:

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