Tag Archives: Congress

What did the Forward mean when it crowned Tim Kaine the “Jewiest” Vice President Pick?

On Friday, after Hillary announced via txt that Tim Kaine would join her on the Democratic ticket, the Forward published an article boldly titled “5 Reasons Tim Kaine Will Be the Jewiest Vice President Pick for Hillary Clinton“. Those five reasons (spoiler alert): He supports the two-state solution “even when others don’t”, is a religious Catholic, helped Sabra attract a factory to Virginia, has hosted several Passover seders, and once set up a Rabbi’s daughter.

Without getting into whether even one of these five things suffices to make someone — politician or otherwise — “Jewy” to any degree (or, as in the case of #2, seemingly rules that possibility out entirely), let’s consider something the article sorely lacks: context. After all, the ‘iest’ in “Jewiest” implies Kaine is “Jewy” compared to at least one someone else. So we shall proceed by process of elimination.

Continue reading What did the Forward mean when it crowned Tim Kaine the “Jewiest” Vice President Pick?

Advertisements

Occupy Malheur should never have come as such a surprise

When a band of militiamen peeled off from a larger protest in Burns, Oregon, to occupy the nearby (in 10,000-square mile Harney County terms) Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, they took law enforcement officials largely by surprise:

Continue reading Occupy Malheur should never have come as such a surprise

Thanks to Bernie, Republicans are gonna need a bigger squirrel

Back when Bernie announced his nascent candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination, Matt Taibbi over at Rolling Stone presciently* wrote that the “question of ‘seriousness’ . . . will dominate coverage of the Sanders campaign.”

*And I presciently put in my two cents.

He was right. Here are just a few headlines from one week in January, around the time that Bernie began to seriously close the gap with Hillary in Iowa:

Continue reading Thanks to Bernie, Republicans are gonna need a bigger squirrel

How seriousness a candidate is Bernie Sanders, measured in Republican squirrels?

Seventy three-year old Independent Senator Bernie Sanders will announce his candidacy for the Democratic nomination this coming Thursday, April 30. I suppose waiting one whole day until International Workers’ Day on May 1 would have been too predictable for the socialist candidate.

But my nitpicking over the timing of Sanders’ announcement probably won’t matter at the end of the day (May Day, that is). Hillary is widely predicted to run him over in the primary. It’s easy to see from the disparity in media coverage that she is simply viewed as a much more serious candidate.

Continue reading How seriousness a candidate is Bernie Sanders, measured in Republican squirrels?

Larry Wilmore is a liar, and pathetic, and alone in life, and mean. And mean. And mean.

On last night’s The Nightly Show, Larry Wilmore  said something – in connection with the recent confirmation of new attorney general Loretta Lynch – that is just demonstrably untrue:

Continue reading Larry Wilmore is a liar, and pathetic, and alone in life, and mean. And mean. And mean.

For once, the media got it right, and Jon Stewart got it wrong

Last Wednesday, Jon Stewart ran a segment titled “Seriously, Guys, What Are We Doing Here?” The piece was addressed to the reporters who stalk Hillary around the country, and centered around a clip depicting several dozen of them sprinting after her “Mystery Mobile” (so-named because it resembles Scooby’s vehicle of choice).

After suggesting several good reasons for someone to chase vans — “If the van was perhaps the Good Humor truck, and you were five” — Stewart proceeds to good humorlessly berate his targets:

Continue reading For once, the media got it right, and Jon Stewart got it wrong

What’s the real takeaway from Bibi’s fearmongering on ISIS?

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s extended campaign ad — filmed before the United States Congress — has been grabbing all the headlines, but on Last Week Tonight last night, John Oliver drew viewers’ attention to an earlier piece in support of his reelection:

Continue reading What’s the real takeaway from Bibi’s fearmongering on ISIS?

The New York Times just gave a convincing demonstration of how useless corrections really are

Often, by the time a newspaper publishes a critical correction, it’s far too little and far too late to make much of an impact on the narrative of the original story. For example, when tensions flared across Israel and the West Bank late last year, the New York Times published the following allegation:

Continue reading The New York Times just gave a convincing demonstration of how useless corrections really are

Jon Stewart’s guest last night could use some serious perspective

Millionaire hedge fund manager Bill Browder visited Jon Stewart last night to promote his new book, Red Notice. The book describes an incident in which Browder’s Russian lawyer was kidnapped, tortured, and murdered by corrupt businessmen he had testified against in Russia.

In addition to writing a book, Browder also worked to pass American legislation that would punish individuals who participated in such shameful behavior. Here’s how he described the consequences of getting on the list created by that piece of legislation:

Continue reading Jon Stewart’s guest last night could use some serious perspective

New York Times op-ed writers interested in exactly the opposite of what I’m interested in

I recently stumbled across an Op-Ed written by two YLS professors that appeared in the New York Times nearly a month ago. The piece was titled, “Obama, the Least Lame President?“, a headline that immediately made me wonder: who was our most lame President?

One obvious contender, recently put forward by Parks & Recreation, is number nine, William Henry Harrison:

Continue reading New York Times op-ed writers interested in exactly the opposite of what I’m interested in