Tag Archives: Minnesota

The Daily Show wasted its imagination on Marco’s road to the White House

[Editor’s note: I wrote this post a week ago. I promptly forgot to publish it. Rubio’s departure from the primary this evening simultaneously reminded me of its existence and rendered it obsolete. C’est la vie.]

Last week [Editor’s note: two weeks ago], in the immediate wake of Super Tuesday, The Daily Show put together a segment contrasting the Rubio campaign’s persistent optimism with Marco’s underwhelming performance in the Republican primaries so far:

Continue reading The Daily Show wasted its imagination on Marco’s road to the White House

Why I’m not too worried about Russell Wilson’s “questionable” decision-making

I’ll admit that in the past I’ve expressed concern regarding Russell Wilson’s questionable decision-making. See, “The narrative is wrong: Russell Wilson makes questionable decisions, too“, and “The one guy Russell Wilson needs to stop taking advice from“. But here’s the thing: both of those posts deal with his decision-making ability off the field. I have yet to question (so far as I can recall) his ability on the field. Which is why scaremongering headlines like this one — “Russell Wilson’s Decision-Making Is a Concern Heading into Super Bowl” — don’t have me too worried heading into Super Bowl Sunday.

In fact, in case I wasn’t confident enough before, the article itself actually helped reassure me. Here’s how its author, Sean Tomlinson, spins Wilson’s performance against Green Bay in the NFC Championship Game into his source of primary concern:

Continue reading Why I’m not too worried about Russell Wilson’s “questionable” decision-making

This weekend’s demonstration you probably missed

Over the past week, demonstrations have been held across the United States in reaction to a spate of tragic police killings. Here’s the BBC’s roundup:

In New York City on Friday, protesters briefly laid down in Macy’s flagship store, at Grand Central Terminal and at an Apple store.

Hundreds streamed along Fifth Avenue and other parts of Manhattan, with banners and chants of “Black lives matter” and “I can’t breathe” – a reference to the words of Eric Garner as he was being restrained by a white police officer.

In other protests on Friday:

  • Activists marched through central Miami, Florida, and blocked a major causeway connecting Miami to Miami Beach
  • Hundreds of people in Providence, Rhode Island, blocked streets and police had to stop some from walking on to Interstate 95
  • Crowds of protesters in New Haven, Connecticut, marched to the courthouse
  • Dozens of students from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, brought rush-hour traffic to a crawl and forced the city to postpone a tree lighting ceremony scheduled at Monument Square
  • In Minneapolis, some protesters blocked traffic by marching or lying in the middle of a highway

Meanwhile, in Boston (and possibly elsewhere; I haven’t done the research):

Continue reading This weekend’s demonstration you probably missed

John Oliver’s evisceration of Miss America shows he doesn’t understand beauty pageant winners

In John Oliver’s acclaimed evisceration of the Miss America pageant, HBO’s new host investigated the pageant’s oft-repeated claim that it makes $45 million in scholarship money available to contestants on an annual basis. Unsurprisingly, he concluded that the stated figure substantially overstates reality.

But he was wrong,* and it’s all because his fact-finding elves didn’t dig deep enough into the types of people who compete in the pageant — and particularly, into their educational proclivities (emphasis added):

Continue reading John Oliver’s evisceration of Miss America shows he doesn’t understand beauty pageant winners

Kid Mayor’s tenure has been an absolute abomination of nutritional sufficiency

You’re probably already familiar with Kid President — but have you heard of Kid Mayor?

If not, you’re already too late. “Kid Mayor” Robert “Bobby” Tufts was ousted on Sunday, after two years at the head of tiny Dorset, Minnesota.

The story’s pretty adorable — I’m not going to rehash it here — but I, for one, am glad his term is over. The five year old was clearly ill equipped for anything resembling a position of responsibility. Every article I found about Tufts mentioned that one of the main planks in his campaign platform was “to declare ice cream top of the food pyramid.” And you thought the United States government accomplishes nothing; the top of the pyramid is kind of where ice cream already belongs — in the part where you’re not supposed to eat too much:

Continue reading Kid Mayor’s tenure has been an absolute abomination of nutritional sufficiency

I tried to write about basketball and ended up writing about science fiction and the Middle East

My most recent post was about the conflict in the Middle East. So was the one before that and the one before that. And two of the next three before that. And so on. Not quite two solid months of football in the weeks leading up to the Super Bowl, but I could easily pull off a similar streak if given half the chance. It’s hard not to write about geopolitical issues that affect people I love (that is, people), and I still have a lot more to say.

But the Israeli-Palestinian conflict can too often resemble rival fans supporting their favorite teams — the message of my previous post notwithstanding — so to distance myself from falling completely back into familiar patterns, I hope to periodically punctuate my commentary on the real conflict with frivolous asides about meaningless sports. In other words, what I usually like to talk about. At a minimum, I hope the breaks will provide me with a reminder that war is not sport.

All that said, I can’t help myself. It’s impossible to discuss my topic tonight without thinking of what’s happening on the shores of the Mediterranean. Without further ado, I present the ongoing trade negotiations between Cleveland and Minnesota. (Bear with me.)

Continue reading I tried to write about basketball and ended up writing about science fiction and the Middle East

Real winners and losers from baseball’s opening day

The baseball season is (roughly) one day old, but that didn’t stop Yahoo! Sports from publishing an article titled “Winners and losers from the ‘real’ opening day“:

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In which I fact-check ESPN

Welcome to the latest installment of Paper Treiger Fact-checks Major Media Outlets. In recent months, I’ve done it to the New York Times, and in the post that immediately preceded this one, I did it to Yahoo! Sports.

Next up, the worldwide leader in sports.

Like the rest of the football universe, ESPN is excited about the slate of playoff survivors, and published an article titled It’s what they’ve been waiting for about the coming matchup at the Clink between Seattle and San Francisco. Here’s the offending paragraph:

This entire season, dating back to the offseason, seemingly has been building for this moment: Seattle-San Francisco, Take III. The two franchises have been traveling on parallel tracks. They are almost carbon copies of each other. They both have coaches who came to them from the Pac-12. They both have young, mobile quarterbacks. San Francisco traded for Baltimore wide receiver Anquan Boldin in the offseason. Seattle countered by trading for Minnesota wide receiver Percy Harvin.

Funny, that’s not the way it was reported at the time. Here’s NFL.com’s account:

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Xbox: Just insensitive advertising or is it grave-dancing?

Because it somewhat reminded me of a previously-published post (It seems everybody’s rooting for San Francisco — could this help explain why?), I was originally planning to let this screenshot of a popular Seahawks blog speak for itself:

Continue reading Xbox: Just insensitive advertising or is it grave-dancing?

Stephen Colbert hides a secret message in the closed captioning

As I have previously noted, Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert’s closed captioning services are often good for mild amusement at their own expense, like that time they transcribed “rectal scrape” as “rectal crepe”. [Editor’s note: I suppose you can’t really win that situation.]

I don’t normally share every delightful example of closed caption-anigans – I come across them every day, and I blog these days at something less than that level of frequency – but there was something different about last night’s episode of The Colbert Report: whoever put the captions together used them to make a joke. Sort of like what happens on The Word, only for deaf people.

The “mistake” popped up in Colbert’s segment about a candidate to succeed Michele Bachmann in the House, Tom Emmer. At first glance, the error seems rather innocent – a slip of grammar, specifically, a missing hyphen – but when you take a look at how the sentence as a whole was transcribed (that is, with two other, properly-placed hyphens), you get the sense that someone over at Comedy Central went out of his way to communicate what he thinks about state’s rights (or at least the candidates who espouse them):

Continue reading Stephen Colbert hides a secret message in the closed captioning