Tag Archives: Wikipedia

Who should the GOP draft to take down Trump? This brave five year-old girl

There’s been a lot of finger-pointing about just who is most responsible for the rise of Trump, but there is at least one point of broad consensus: for too long, the GOP was afraid of attacking him, and his adversaries spent far too long tearing down one another instead.

On some level, their strategy was understandable: Trump was a punchline until he wasn’t, and so his rivals devoted most of their energy to jockeying for second place. Moreover, it’s unclear that any of their attacks would even stick. When Marco Rubio tried his hand at insult comedy, the results fell far short of spectacular.

But those considerations did not deter all his adversaries. Back in 2010, one five year-old girl issued a challenge to Donald Trump, nearly six years before any Republican candidate managed to accomplish the same feat:

Continue reading Who should the GOP draft to take down Trump? This brave five year-old girl

Advertisements

The Daily Show wasted its imagination on Marco’s road to the White House

[Editor’s note: I wrote this post a week ago. I promptly forgot to publish it. Rubio’s departure from the primary this evening simultaneously reminded me of its existence and rendered it obsolete. C’est la vie.]

Last week [Editor’s note: two weeks ago], in the immediate wake of Super Tuesday, The Daily Show put together a segment contrasting the Rubio campaign’s persistent optimism with Marco’s underwhelming performance in the Republican primaries so far:

Continue reading The Daily Show wasted its imagination on Marco’s road to the White House

The original Stephen Colbert made Stephen Colbert’s job that much harder

Erstwhile right-wing pundit Stephen Colbert famously introduced us to the concept of Wikiality coming up on ten years ago. On the now-defunct The Colbert Report, he explained that — under the rules of Wikipedia — in order for something to be considered true,

Continue reading The original Stephen Colbert made Stephen Colbert’s job that much harder

I expect better from a website called *Tree*hugger

California is running out of water. Almonds take a lot of water to grow. California accounts for 80% of global almond cultivation (and 99% of U.S. production). The obvious conclusion, as the BBC put it, is that “almonds are sucking California dry“. You can tell a similar story about walnuts and pistachios, if you wanted to.

But misguided as that conclusion may be, some people have taken this set of facts as a reason to reduce their overall nut consumption — and, as usual, the internet is here to help them out. Last month, Treehugger published an article titled “5 nuts not grown in California”. It explained, “National almond, walnut and pistachio crops are very thirsty, and predominantly grown in drought-stricken California; if you’re looking for alternatives, consider these.”

Seems reasonable enough. So let’s find out: which five nuts does Treehugger have in mind (cumulative nut count in parentheses)?

Continue reading I expect better from a website called *Tree*hugger

Blown joke nicely illustrates the danger of giving Neil deGrasse Tyson his own show

Last Thursday, The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore played host to (among others) Neil deGrasse Tyson, who is set to launch a brand new nightly talk show this very evening on the National Geographic Channel. I almost wish they’d let Neil take over the 11:30 Comedy Central slot from Larry Wilmore instead.

The need for Tyson’s scientific insight to reach a wider audience was nicely illustrated on March 26, when Larry hosted a four-person roundtable that included both alleged comedian J.B. Smoove and Nightly Show showrunner (and Daily Show veteran) Rory Albanese.

When the panel’s discussion turned to ISIS, Smoove joked that Isis was actually the name of a “lady who puts ice in her mouth before she gives you a blowjob.” Get it? It’s a joke about linguistics: ISIS contains, inter alia, the lone phoneme — /’aɪs/ — in “ice”.

Continue reading Blown joke nicely illustrates the danger of giving Neil deGrasse Tyson his own show

Who’s wiping Israel off the map now?: Middle East tech sector edition

Those articles that appear on the front page of LinkedIn don’t always catch my eye, but when they do, they’re probably titled something like, “The Story Behind the Largest Internet Acquisition in Middle East History.” So it was that I found myself reading an article bearing precisely that title when I came across a rather remarkable claim:

Continue reading Who’s wiping Israel off the map now?: Middle East tech sector edition

The New York Times just gave a convincing demonstration of how useless corrections really are

Often, by the time a newspaper publishes a critical correction, it’s far too little and far too late to make much of an impact on the narrative of the original story. For example, when tensions flared across Israel and the West Bank late last year, the New York Times published the following allegation:

Continue reading The New York Times just gave a convincing demonstration of how useless corrections really are

About those “Seadderall Cheathawks”

At the beginning of Thursday’s The Nightly Show, (apparently-devoted Seahawks fan) Larry Wilmore had the following to say:

Continue reading About those “Seadderall Cheathawks”

A religious survey of Arabs in the Knesset

I was inspired by a recent MSNBC article on Israel’s Druze community to check up on the history of Druze members of Knesset. On the way, I found myself on the Wikipedia page titled List of Arab members of the Knesset. Here’s a partial screenshot — don’t bother squinting, I summarize immediately below:

Continue reading A religious survey of Arabs in the Knesset

John Oliver’s evisceration of Miss America shows he doesn’t understand beauty pageant winners

In John Oliver’s acclaimed evisceration of the Miss America pageant, HBO’s new host investigated the pageant’s oft-repeated claim that it makes $45 million in scholarship money available to contestants on an annual basis. Unsurprisingly, he concluded that the stated figure substantially overstates reality.

But he was wrong,* and it’s all because his fact-finding elves didn’t dig deep enough into the types of people who compete in the pageant — and particularly, into their educational proclivities (emphasis added):

Continue reading John Oliver’s evisceration of Miss America shows he doesn’t understand beauty pageant winners